"People tend to have one of three ‘styles’ of interaction. There are takers, who are always trying to serve themselves; matchers, who are always trying to get equal benefit for themselves and others; and givers, who are always trying to help people."

— From Business Insider: Wharton Professor Adam Grant Explains Why The Most Successful People Are Givers

"Everyone according to their talent and every talent according to its work."

— French proverb

"Wisdom begins in wonder."

— Socrates

I suspect this would garner a snort from the brilliant Christopher Hitchens if he were still with us.

I suspect this would garner a snort from the brilliant Christopher Hitchens if he were still with us.

(Source: theonion)

fastcompany:

For the hit AMC show’s seventh edition, iconic designer gets trippy with Don Draper.

So. Excited. The show that has made us remember our past only to realize how little some things have changed.

fastcompany:

For the hit AMC show’s seventh edition, iconic designer gets trippy with Don Draper.

So. Excited. The show that has made us remember our past only to realize how little some things have changed.

Wanderlust Wednesday: Magic in the Sky
The Yi Peng Festival in Thailand truly provides the magic on earth that we all need.  Wonder and delight contained in a humble, little lantern.  Total awe!
Photograph by Justin Ng, Your Shot http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/profile/121514/ 

Wanderlust Wednesday: Magic in the Sky

The Yi Peng Festival in Thailand truly provides the magic on earth that we all need.  Wonder and delight contained in a humble, little lantern.  Total awe!

Photograph by Justin Ng, Your Shot http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/profile/121514/ 

(Source: nprfreshair)

asiasociety:

Photos/Video: Celebrating Chinese New Year’s Eve in a Historic Village in China

Experience the sights and sounds of Bishan, a rural village in China’s Anhui province, on January 30, the eve of the Year of the Horse.

Read the full story here.

Happy New Year!

nprfreshair:

Have a great weekend, y’all.

nprfreshair:

Have a great weekend, y’all.

"So rather than hear about the stigma men feel in terms of taking care of kids, I’d like for men to think more about the stigma that women feel when they’re trying to build a career and a family. And then measure whatever angst they’re feeling against the real systemic forces that devalue the labor of women. I think that’s what’s at the root of much of this: When some people do certain work we cheer. When others do it we yawn."

— Ta-Nehisi Coates, Why I’m Against ‘Daddy Days’ (via jessicavalenti)

Amen.

"

One of the first things a student learns when studying Mandarin is the third person pronoun, tā. This was originally written 他 , with “human” radical (a radical is a part of a Chinese character that imparts some semantic or linguistic information), and it stood for feminine, masculine, and neuter—”he,” “she,” and “it.” During the early 20th century, however, some bright folks—undoubtedly in emulation of European languages—thought it would be a good idea to introduce gender into the Chinese writing system, so 她 (with “female” radical) came to be used for the feminine and 它 (with “roof” radical) for the neuter. I always thought that rather odd, because no attempt was made to differentiate the three forms in speech, only in writing, hence 他, 她, and 它 were still all pronounced tā.

[…]

In recent years, however, there has been an attempt to get rid of the gender distinctions for the third person pronoun and go back to a genderless stage. What is most curious, though, is the manner in which this is being done, namely through Pinyin, the system by which Chinese characters are transcribed into the Roman alphabet. In other words, 他, 她, 它, 牠, and others— all pronounced tā—are now being replaced by the actual letters “ta”!

"

— A gender-neutral pronoun is gaining traction in China. Meanwhile, Pete Seeger had it down for English 40 years ago. (via explore-blog)

Fascinating.

(Source: , via explore-blog)